Asked  2 Years ago    Answers:  5   Viewed   92 times

I know that PHP doesn't yet have native Enumerations. But I have become accustomed to them from the Java world. I would love to use enums as a way to give predefined values which IDEs' auto-completion features could understand.

Constants do the trick, but there's the namespace collision problem and (or actually because) they're global. Arrays don't have the namespace problem, but they're too vague, they can be overwritten at runtime and IDEs rarely know how to autofill their keys without additional static analysis annotations or attributes.

Are there any solutions/workarounds you commonly use? Does anyone recall whether the PHP guys have had any thoughts or decisions around enumerations?

 Answers

3

Depending upon use case, I would normally use something simple like the following:

abstract class DaysOfWeek
{
    const Sunday = 0;
    const Monday = 1;
    // etc.
}

$today = DaysOfWeek::Sunday;

However, other use cases may require more validation of constants and values. Based on the comments below about reflection, and a few other notes, here's an expanded example which may better serve a much wider range of cases:

abstract class BasicEnum {
    private static $constCacheArray = NULL;

    private static function getConstants() {
        if (self::$constCacheArray == NULL) {
            self::$constCacheArray = [];
        }
        $calledClass = get_called_class();
        if (!array_key_exists($calledClass, self::$constCacheArray)) {
            $reflect = new ReflectionClass($calledClass);
            self::$constCacheArray[$calledClass] = $reflect->getConstants();
        }
        return self::$constCacheArray[$calledClass];
    }

    public static function isValidName($name, $strict = false) {
        $constants = self::getConstants();

        if ($strict) {
            return array_key_exists($name, $constants);
        }

        $keys = array_map('strtolower', array_keys($constants));
        return in_array(strtolower($name), $keys);
    }

    public static function isValidValue($value, $strict = true) {
        $values = array_values(self::getConstants());
        return in_array($value, $values, $strict);
    }
}

By creating a simple enum class that extends BasicEnum, you now have the ability to use methods thusly for simple input validation:

abstract class DaysOfWeek extends BasicEnum {
    const Sunday = 0;
    const Monday = 1;
    const Tuesday = 2;
    const Wednesday = 3;
    const Thursday = 4;
    const Friday = 5;
    const Saturday = 6;
}

DaysOfWeek::isValidName('Humpday');                  // false
DaysOfWeek::isValidName('Monday');                   // true
DaysOfWeek::isValidName('monday');                   // true
DaysOfWeek::isValidName('monday', $strict = true);   // false
DaysOfWeek::isValidName(0);                          // false

DaysOfWeek::isValidValue(0);                         // true
DaysOfWeek::isValidValue(5);                         // true
DaysOfWeek::isValidValue(7);                         // false
DaysOfWeek::isValidValue('Friday');                  // false

As a side note, any time I use reflection at least once on a static/const class where the data won't change (such as in an enum), I cache the results of those reflection calls, since using fresh reflection objects each time will eventually have a noticeable performance impact (Stored in an assocciative array for multiple enums).

Now that most people have finally upgraded to at least 5.3, and SplEnum is available, that is certainly a viable option as well--as long as you don't mind the traditionally unintuitive notion of having actual enum instantiations throughout your codebase. In the above example, BasicEnum and DaysOfWeek cannot be instantiated at all, nor should they be.

Sunday, October 23, 2022
2

Apparently in my DbConnect class my PHPDoc comments stated that I was returning 'database' when in fact I was returning a 'mysqli' datatype. This was what was causing the error. The simply fix to this problem was to change be PHPDoc annotation to 'mysqli' and the code completions started to work again.

Saturday, October 22, 2022
 
2

This should work with PHP 7:

class foo {
var $bar = 'I am bar.';
}

$foo = new foo();
$bar = 'bar';
$baz = array('foo', 'bar', 'baz', 'quux');
echo "{$foo->$bar}n";
echo "{$foo->{$baz[1]}}n";

This is caused because in PHP 5 the following line:

echo "{$foo->$baz[1]}n";

is interpreted as:

echo "{$foo->{$baz[1]}}n";

While in PHP 7 it's interpreted as:

echo "{{$foo->$baz}[1]}n";

And so in PHP 7 it's passing the entire array to $foo instead of just that element.

Thursday, September 8, 2022
 
1

PhpStorm generates special temporary "wrapping" to execute the tests and get the output in the form it understands better. In your case it's /private/var/folders/qh/xjz1kr297v34pl6zy70_2rl00000gn/T/ide-phpunit.php. Since the error says there is a syntax error, the first thing you should try is deleting it, on the next run the IDE will create the new one, hopefully without that problem.

If that doesn't help, as suggested in the comments, try downgrading the PHPUnit a few versions back, see if that helps. Alternatively try reinstalling the PhpStorm. If that doesn't work, you have better chances of finding an answer by reporting an issue to the dev team.

Saturday, October 22, 2022
4

Silly mistake on my part... simply forgot to add phpunit as a dependency in the project. For anyone else that gets this error, to composer.json add:

"require-dev": {
    "phpunit/phpunit": "3.7.*"
},

And then run:

composer update

That solved the problem.

Sunday, November 27, 2022
 
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