Asked  2 Years ago    Answers:  5   Viewed   147 times

What I did:

I think there were some weird configurations from the github gui that caused this issue and prevented me from being able to easily use git from command line or even git-bash.

I ended up just uninstalling github and git then reinstalling just git for windows. I now have everything running off the command line(except ssh which I run from git-bash). Much easier and more reliable that the github gui.

Thanks to mu 無 for taking the time to try to figure this out. I didn't end up using his answer, but if I hadn't needed to do a reinstall of git it would have been what I needed to do.


I am using the github gui on my local machine. I just noticed that a commit I was about to make was going to update all of my recently update node modules. I set up my .gitignore to ignore the entire node_modules/ directory.

I'm not sure what to do about this. All the file types I included in .gitignore were ignored. It's just the directories that it seems to ignore.

Here is my .gitignore file:

#################
## Sublime Text
#################

*.sublime-project
*.sublime-workspace

#################
## Images
#################

*.jpg
*.jpeg
*.png
*.gif
*.psd
*.ai

#################
## Windows detritus
#################

# Windows image file caches
Thumbs.db
ehthumbs.db

# Folder config file
Desktop.ini

# Recycle Bin used on file shares
$RECYCLE.BIN/

# Mac crap
.DS_Store

#################
## Directories
#################

dev/
cms/core/config/
node_modules/

 Answers

5

Since the node_modules directory is already tracked as part of the repository, the .gitignore rule will not apply to it.

You need to untrack the directory from git using

git rm -r --cached node_modules
git commit -m "removing node_modules"

You can run the above 2 in git-bash.

After this, the .gitignore rule will ignore the directory away.

Note that this will remove the directory node_modules from your other repos once you pull the changes in. Only the original repo where you made that commit will still have the node_modules folder there.

Thursday, October 6, 2022
 
mbu
 
mbu
1

Create a file named .gitignore in your project's directory. Ignore directories by entering the directory name into the file (with a slash appended):

dir_to_ignore/

More information is here.

Sunday, December 4, 2022
 
nemmy
 
3

If all of the css/ux files are within a particular subfolder, and you want him to have access to everything in that directory, and further down, you could do it with git submodules.

The contractor would have push/pull rights to the repo that is a submodule, but no commit rights on the main repo.

You could also just use the pull request feature and make sure that he only commits to the folder he wants.

Tuesday, November 8, 2022
 
nickc
 
1

A file which is already tracked would not be ignored: you need to remove from the index first.

git rm --cached private.xml 
git add -u .
git commit -m "Record deletion of private.xml from the index"

(the --cached option make sure the file remains on the disk)

Then you can add it in the .gitignore (no need for '*')

private.xml 

Note: whenever an file is or is not ignored, you can check out which .gitignore rule applies with:

git check-ignore -v -- private.xml
Wednesday, October 19, 2022
 
vcninc
 
4

I would recommend using tags (tag tutorial)

From your master branch since you are done v1.0 add a tag called v1.0.

git tag -a v1.0 -m "Tagging release 1.0"

This way you can always come back to a specific version at any time by calling git checkout [tag_name]

Another common practice is to use branches to work on features until they are stable.

git checkout -b [feature-branch]

That creates a new branch named whatever is in [feature-branch] and checks it out. Be sure to do this from where you want to start working on the feature (typically from master).

Once stable they can then be safely merged into master. From master run:

git merge [feature-branch]

This way your master branch always stays in a working state and only completed items get added once ready. This will allow you to keep a working copy of the app at all times (ideally anyways) for testing, etc.

You could use branches for each version of the application however using tags makes it so you can't merge into another branch version by accident.

Friday, October 14, 2022
 
rplusg
 
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