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I have several buttons on my page, but I'm not sure how to tell which one was clicked. Here's the markup for my two buttons:

<input type="submit" id="btnSubmit" value="Save Changes" />
<input type="submit" id="btnDelete" value="Delete" />

 Answers

3

With an HTML form like:

<input type="submit" name="btnSubmit" value="Save Changes" />
<input type="submit" name="btnDelete" value="Delete" />

The PHP code to use would look like:

if ($_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] === 'POST') {
    // Something posted

    if (isset($_POST['btnDelete'])) {
        // btnDelete
    } else {
        // Assume btnSubmit
    }
}

You should always assume or default to the first submit button to appear in the form HTML source code. In practice, the various browsers reliably send the name/value of a submit button with the post data when:

  1. The user literally clicks the submit button with the mouse or pointing device
  2. Or there is focus on the submit button (they tabbed to it), and then the Enter key is pressed.

Other ways to submit a form exist, and some browsers/versions decide not to send the name/value of any submit buttons in some of these situations. For example, many users submit forms by pressing the Enter key when the cursor/focus is on a text field. Forms can also be submitted via JavaScript, as well as some more obscure methods.

It's important to pay attention to this detail, otherwise you can really frustrate your users when they submit a form, yet "nothing happens" and their data is lost, because your code failed to detect a form submission, because you did not anticipate the fact that the name/value of a submit button may not be sent with the post data.

Also, the above advice should be used for forms with a single submit button too because you should always assume a default submit button.

I'm aware that the Internet is filled with tons of form-handler tutorials, and almost of all them do nothing more than check for the name and value of a submit button. But, they're just plain wrong!

Saturday, December 10, 2022
5

Here's what worked best for me when trying to script this (in case anyone else comes across this like I did):

$ pecl -d php_suffix=5.6 install <package>
$ pecl uninstall -r <package>

$ pecl -d php_suffix=7.0 install <package>
$ pecl uninstall -r <package>

$ pecl -d php_suffix=7.1 install <package>
$ pecl uninstall -r <package>

The -d php_suffix=<version> piece allows you to set config values at run time vs pre-setting them with pecl config-set. The uninstall -r bit does not actually uninstall it (from the docs):

vagrant@homestead:~$ pecl help uninstall
pecl uninstall [options] [channel/]<package> ...
Uninstalls one or more PEAR packages.  More than one package may be
specified at once.  Prefix with channel name to uninstall from a
channel not in your default channel (pecl.php.net)

Options:
  ...
  -r, --register-only
        do not remove files, only register the packages as not installed
  ...

The uninstall line is necessary otherwise installing it will remove any previously installed version, even if it was for a different PHP version (ex: Installing an extension for PHP 7.0 would remove the 5.6 version if the package was still registered as installed).

Monday, December 12, 2022
5

For sending out the actual e-mail I would recommend using the PHPMailer library, it makes everything much easier.

Wednesday, October 12, 2022
5

Implement View's OnClickListner in your activity class. Override on click method.

 Button b1= (Button) findViewById(R.id.button1);
//find your button id defined in your xml. 


b1.setOnClickListener(this);
// You have button OnClickListener implemented in your activity class.
//this refers to your activity context.

I have used a toast message.

http://developer.android.com/guide/topics/ui/notifiers/toasts.html

 Toast.makeText(MainActivity.this,"button1", 1000).show();
 //display a toast using activity context ,text and duration

Using switch case you can check which button is clicked.

In your onClick method.

switch(v.getId())  //get the id of the view clicked. (in this case button)
{
case R.id.button1 : // if its button1
    //do something
    break;
}

Here's the complete code.

public class MainActivity extends Activity implements OnClickListener {

@Override
protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);
    Button b1= (Button) findViewById(R.id.button1);
    Button b2= (Button) findViewById(R.id.button2);
    Button b3= (Button) findViewById(R.id.button3);
    b1.setOnClickListener(this);
    b2.setOnClickListener(this);
    b3.setOnClickListener(this);

}

@Override
public void onClick(View v) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    switch(v.getId())
    {
    case R.id.button1 :
        Toast.makeText(MainActivity.this,"button1", 1000).show();
        break;
    case R.id.button2 :
        Toast.makeText(MainActivity.this,"button2", 1000).show();
        break;
    case R.id.button3 :
        Toast.makeText(MainActivity.this,"button3", 1000).show();
        break;  


    }

}
 }
Thursday, August 25, 2022
 
4

Never used any of those, but they look interesting..

Take a look at Gearman as well.. more overhead in systems like these but you get other cool stuff :) Guess it depends on your needs ..

Friday, November 11, 2022
 
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